General Resources

 
 
Share this
 
 
Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 14:18
What is hepatitis E? Hepatitis E is a serious liver disease that is caused by infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV).
Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 14:10
What is hepatitis D? Hepatitis D is a liver disease that develops after infection with the hepatitis D virus (HDV). This infection only occurs if a person also has hepatitis B.
Wednesday, January 29, 2014 - 14:01
Hepatitis A is a liver disease that develops after infection with the hepatitis A virus. “Hepatitis” means inflammation of the liver which is the result of infection or injury. In some people, HAV infection will result in a mild illness lasting only a week or two, while in others it may be much more severe and last for several months. However, unlike other hepatitis viruses, hepatitis A does not ever become a long-term “chronic” infection although it can relapse after initial improvement.
Wednesday, November 13, 2013 - 13:38
Hepatitis C – A Crisis In the African American Community, Findings and Recommendations, a peered-reviewed consensus paper by the National Medical Association (NMA), October 2013
Tuesday, October 8, 2013 - 20:37
This series of 10 “mini-lectures” were developed by Dr. Robert Gish, one of America’s leading Hepatologists.
Wednesday, February 20, 2013 - 11:23
Friday, June 15, 2012 - 13:08
The Support Partnership, a collaboration of nationally recognized hepatitis C organizations (all are members of NVHR), has launched a peer-managed toll-free helpline for people affected by hepatitis C
Saturday, August 27, 2011 - 14:34
More than 26 articles and 200 pages of previously unpublished insight into More than 26 articles and 200 pages of previously unpublished insight into the forefront of regenerative medicine.
Tuesday, August 23, 2011 - 11:50
Viral hepatitis is a silent epidemic in the United States. Although it is a leading infectious cause of death and claims the lives of 12,000–15,000 Americans each year, viral hepatitis remains virtually unknown to the general public, at-risk populations, and policymakers; even health care providers sometimes lack knowledge and awareness about these infections. As a consequence, most of the 3.5–5.3 million Americans living with viral hepatitis do not know that they are infected, placing them at greater risk for severe, even fatal, complications from the disease and increasing the likelihood that they will spread the virus to others.
Friday, May 20, 2011 - 11:59
These publications contain ready-to-print educational materials for healthcare professionals and their patients.